Social Media Quick Tip: Clean Up Your Twitter Following

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There are tens of thousands of third-party applications to help us use Twitter. Hundreds of those are designed specifically to help determine who to unfollow. Why would you want to unfollow someone? Two reasons to unfollow someone are:

1. Because the account is inactive; and

2. Because they’re not following you.
 
It’s good to keep your following well-maintained. If you follow a lot more people than follow you back, Twitter will not allow you to follow more people. Additionally, in case it matters to you, on Twitter, it’s not considered good form. Although there are many tools to help with this, here are two I use often:

1. Untweeps.com: This handy little tool allows you to sign in with your Twitter account and see the people you follow who haven’t tweeted in months. You can select how many days it’s been and then select who to unfollow.

2. JustUnfollow.com: Sign in with your Twitter credentials. The next screen allows you to decide if you want to view unfollowers (those you follow who don’t follow you) or fans (those who follow you who you don’t follow). Both are good to take a look at and decide for yourself if you’d like to make adjustments.

Want More?
Want to learn more about social media, the Internet and law enforcement? Attend the SMILE Conference, which will be hosted by the Dallas Police Department, Sept. 28-30. One full day will be spent on public order, social activism and the changing relationship with traditional media. To learn more or to register, click here.

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