Social Media Quick Tip: Turn Your Department's Profile Into a Fan Page

fanpage300
If you're using a personal profile page for your department, once you hit 5,000 friends, you can’t have any more. With a fan page, you don’t have that limit.

Editor's Note: This is the first tip in the Social Media Quick Tip series. Each week, Law Officer will post a tip that's intended to help law enforcement officers better navigate the world of social media.

Some police departments set up their Facebook (FB) page as a personal profile page; that is, one that’s meant for an individual person. Instead of someone “liking” your page, they become your friend. There are a few downsides to this, but chief among them is that FB means personal profiles to be for individuals and has been known to shut those pages down. Secondly, once you hit 5,000 friends, you can’t have any more. With a fan page, you don’t have that limit.

The good news is that a recent development in FB allows you to turn your friends into fans. If you have 2,000 friends, you can use the FB migration tool and not lose them, instead they are converted into "likes" on a page. But the only other thing that goes with your fans are your profile photos. All your other photos and any other content should be downloaded for reposting on your new fan page.

Learn more directly from Facebook, including information on how to download your information for backup.

Want More?
Want to learn more about social media, the Internet and law enforcement? Attend the SMILE Conference, which will be hosted by the Chicago Police Department, May 9-11. To learn more or to register, click here. Get $100 off the registration cost by using the code lawofficersmiler.


 

RELATED ARTICLES

In this photo taken Thursday, March 12, 2015, Seattle police officer Debra Pelich, right, wears a video camera on her eyeglasses as she talks with Alex Legesse before a small community gathering in Seattle. The camera is attached to a battery pack and controls on the officer's uniform. As police departments struggle with police body camera videos, the Seattle police, under the direction of new Chief Kathleen O'Toole, are voluntarily putting blurry, silent versions of the videos on YouTube, giving the curious a chance to see what they entail while also protecting the privacy of those depicted. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

States Place Limits on Body Camera Videos

Legislators introduce bills limiting what can be recorded and what can be released.

On the Water

Cincinnati PD uses HD cameras to improve public safety along the Ohio River

Secret Service Tests Drone Flights, Disruptions

Agency faces a new challenge in protecting the President and White House.

Predictive Policing Software

Helping agencies tackle crime trouble spots & trends

Using Video to Calm Tensions, Not Ignite Them

Proactive policing is the best solution when social media scandals arise in the community

Top 10 Reasons to Switch to Eye-Level Worn Video

When recording video ultimately used as evidence, it is important to attain the most complete and unobstructed images possible. Video recorded from the of...
LAW OFFICER CONNECT

CURRENT DISCUSSIONS

 
JOBS